NOAA, FEMA: Be a Force of Nature

National Severe Weather Preparedness Week March 2-8

February 28, 2014

Moore Medical Center entrance before the tornado. (Credit Shane Cohea, Norman Regional Health System)

Moore Medical Center entrance before the tornado. (Credit Shane Cohea, Norman Regional Health System)

During National Severe Weather Preparedness Week March 2 to 8, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) are calling on individuals across the country to Be a Force of Nature: Take the Next Step by preparing for severe weather and encouraging others to do the same.

Just one tornado can cause catastrophic damage. Last year, the EF 5 tornado that struck Moore, Okla., on May 20 killed 24 people and caused more than $2 billion in damage. In 2013, a total of 903 tornadoes were reported in the United States. Those tornadoes occurred in 43 states on 152 days, resulting in 55 fatalities and more than 500 injuries.

Moore Medical Center entrance after the May 20 tornado. (Credit Shane Cohea)

Moore Medical Center entrance after EF5 tornado struck on May 20, 2013. Damage to the hospital was extensive, but no lives were lost thanks to the planning and actions of the hospital administration and staff. (Credit Shane Cohea, Norman Regional Health System)

As more people move to tornado-prone areas, knowing what to do when severe weather strikes could save lives.

“With the devastation of last year’s tornadoes fresh in our minds and springtime almost here, I urge individuals to become weather-ready now,” said NOAA National Weather Service Director Dr. Louis Uccellini. “Make sure you have multiple ways to access forecasts and warnings from NOAA’s National Weather Service before severe weather strikes.”
 
“Being ready today can make a big difference for you when disaster strikes,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. “It only takes a few minutes. Talk with your family and agree to a family plan. Learn easy steps on how to prepare at Ready.gov and find out how your community can take action in America’s PrepareAthon through drills, group discussions and community exercises.”

Our severe weather safety message is simple: know your risk, take action, be an example.

Another view of Moore Medical Center entrance. (Credit Tim Marshall)

Another view of Moore Medical Center entrance. (Credit Tim Marshall)

Technology today makes it easier than ever to be a good example and share the steps you took to become weather-ready.

NOAA and FEMA’s involvement in the innovative Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) project, a new text-like message system, is part of a national effort to increase emergency preparedness and build a Weather-Ready Nation. Last year millions of individuals across the country received WEAs with life-saving weather warnings via their cell phone. These geographically targeted emergency alerts have allowed people to receive weather warnings they would not have otherwise received, and many people took life-saving action. For more information, visit www.ready.gov/alerts

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and our other social media channels.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.