Join us on Twitter: Ask your questions about the climate events of 2011 in a Tweet Chat with NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center


July 11, 2012

Deke Arndt.

Deke Arndt is the chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center.

Download here. (Credit: NOAA)

How warm was 2011 in relation to past years? Were the extreme events we saw in the U.S. the same around the globe?  Why is ocean temperature so important to climate? What is a La Niña and how does it affect climate?  Get answers to these questions and more during our Climate Chat highlighting the release of the 2011 State of the Climate 2011 Report.

Tweet Chat details

About NOAA’s Deke Arndt
Deke Arndt, one of the lead editors of this international peer-reviewed report and climate scientist at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), will answer your questions about the climate in 2011 and key changes to our environment.

Deke Arndt has served as the chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NCDC since 2009. The Branch is responsible for routine and special reporting of the status of the Earth’s climate system, from large global phenomena like global temperature changes to regional occurrences like drought and weather extremes.  Arndt was one of the lead editors for 2009, 2010 and 2011 editions of The State of the Climate reports. Before coming to NCDC, he spent 15 years at the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. Arndt holds a B.S. and M.S. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma. He is studying for a doctoral degree through the University of Oklahoma's Adult & Higher Education program.

About the 2011 State of the Climate Report
The 2011 State of the Climate Report, issued in coordination with the American Meteorological Society (AMS), was compiled by 378 scientists from 48 countries around the world. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments on land, sea, ice and sky. Published annually, the report is part of a suite of climate services NOAA provides government, business and community leaders so they can make informed decisions. Highlights from the report can be seen at www.climate.gov.

About NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center
NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, NC, is a premier service organization dedicated to providing climatological services to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. We maintain the world's largest climate archive containing data as old as 275 years to less than an hour old.  The Center has the primary mission of preserving these data for future generations as well as making them available to the general public, business, industry, government and researchers.

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