NOAA: October warmer than average in the United States

Early season storm breaks October snowfall records across the Northeast, while record drought continues across the Southern Plains

November 8, 2011

October 2011 precipitation "divisional rank" map.

October 2011 temperature "divisional rank" maps.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

During October, a persistent upper-level weather pattern brought below-normal temperatures to the southeastern United States and above-normal temperatures from the Southwest, across the northern tier of the United States, and into parts of the Northeast. Near-normal precipitation during October across the Southern Plains made little change in long-term drought conditions. The drought stricken areas of the Southern Plains still need at least 18 inches of rain in a single month to end the on-going drought.

The average U.S. temperature in October was 55.7 degrees F, 0.9 degrees F above the 1901-2000 long term average. Precipitation, averaged across the nation, was 2.04 inches. This was 0.07 inch below the long-term average, with variability between regions. This monthly analysis, based on records dating back to 1895, is part of the suite of climate services NOAA provides.

U.S. climate highlights – October

October 2011 precipitation "divisional rank" map.

October 2011 precipitation "divisional rank" map.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

August-October and year-to-date

NCDC’s monthly reports are based on preliminary data, which are subject to revision. Additional quality control is applied to the data when late reports are received several weeks after the end of the month and as new scientific methods improve NCDC’s processing algorithms.

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