NOAA Says Prepare for Major Spring Flooding on Red River 

February 5, 2009

Flood waters approaching the bottom of the Sorlie Bridge on April 4, 2006.

Flood waters approaching the bottom of the Sorlie Bridge on April 4, 2006.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA is alerting residents in the Red River Valley, which separates North Dakota and Minnesota, of the potential for significant flooding in their communities this spring. Several factors led to this early projection. The area has received between 200 and 300 percent of normal precipitation since September 2008 and December saw 23 days of snow, leaving water content of snowpack at 170 to 300 percent above normal.
 
“Based on the amount of rain and snowfall in the Red River Basin over the past few months, we’re forecasting a 50 to 75 percent chance of major flooding there this spring,” said Scott Dummer, hydrologist in charge at the North Central River Forecast Center. “NOAA, along with emergency management and local government officials, is communicating the flood risk early to help residents prepare in advance.”
 
Residents in the region can monitor the flood threat online, where NOAA posts frequent updates of local conditions and forecasts using detailed graphics of specific locations and properties along the river.
 
Mark Frazier, head of NOAA’s weather forecast office in Grand Forks said this outlook is a moving target that will change as weather conditions within the Red River Basin evolve in the coming months.
 
“Right now we’re making people aware of the potential for major flooding and asking communities to be prepared should our forecast come to fruition,” Frazier said. “The flood outlook will become more precise as we get closer to the spring thaw, so we’re asking residents to prepare now and continue monitoring the situation.”
 
To help people and communities prepare, NOAA offers the following flood safety tips:

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