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NOAA NAMES VETERAN METEOROLOGIST TO LEAD NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

NOAA image of Jack Hayes, newly appointed assistant administrator for weather services and director of the NOAA National Weather Service.June 7, 2007 NOAA announced the appointment of Jack Hayes as assistant administrator for weather services and director of the NOAA National Weather Service. Hayes will assume his duties on Sept. 2, 2007, and take responsibility for the day-to-day management of NOAA’s weather, hydrologic and climate forecast and warning operations. (Click NOAA image for larger view of Jack Hayes, newly appointed assistant administrator for weather services and director of the NOAA National Weather Service. Click here for high resolution version. Please credit “NOAA.”)

“Jack Hayes brings more than 30 years experience in all areas of atmospheric science including six years with NOAA,” said retired Navy Vice Adm. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. “Americans have come to depend on the life saving products of the National Weather Service and having a seasoned professional like Jack at the helm will ensure we have skilled management supporting these vital services.”

Hayes rejoins NOAA having served the past eighteen months as the director of the world weather watch department at the World Meteorological Organization. In that position, he was responsible for the Global Observing System, Global Telecommunications System, and Global Data Processing and Forecasting System that provide the foundation for operational weather forecasting and warning services for WMO member countries around the world.

Before joining the WMO, Hayes served in several senior executive positions at NOAA. As the deputy assistant administrator for NOAA Research, he was responsible for the management of research programs. During his tenure as deputy assistant administrator of the NOAA Ocean Service, he acted as the chief operating officer dealing with a multitude of coastal issues including creating the foundation for the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. As director of the National Weather Service office of science and technology, he was responsible for science and technology programs that supported weather service operations.

Hayes also possesses extensive executive management experience in the private sector and the military. He was general manager of the $500 million Automated Weather Interactive Processing System program at Litton PRC from 1998 through 2000. AWIPS is the interactive computer system utilized by all weather service forecasters. From 1970 through 1998, he held a variety of meteorological positions with the United States Air Force including command of the Air Force Weather Agency and Air Force Global Weather Center.

"I am very proud to be returning to NOAA," said Hayes. "Weather and climate-sensitive industries accounted for about $4 trillion of the American economy in 2006, and I look forward to working with the talented staff at the National Weather Service, NOAA and our partners to meet the expanding demands for prompt, accurate weather information."

Hayes received his master’s and doctorate degrees in meteorology from the U.S. Navy Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. He is a graduate of Bowling Green State University, with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics.

The NOAA National Weather Service is the primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters, and ocean areas for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. The data and products provided by the weather service form a national information database and infrastructure that can be used by other government agencies, the private sector, the public, and the global community.

NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and information service delivery for transportation, and by providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 60 countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and protects.

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Media Contact:
Dave Miller, NOAA Office of Communications, (202) 482-6090