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POWERFUL WINTER STORM CONTINUES TO AFFECT THE NORTHEAST

NOAA image of snow in Falls Church, Va.Feb. 12, 2006 A classic nor'easter, the first major winter storm of 2006, continued its trek along the Northeast U.S. coastline Sunday, producing heavy snow, strong winds and coastal flooding from the mid-Atlantic states to Maine, according to the NOAA National Weather Service. (Click NOAA image for larger view of snow in Falls Church, Va. Click here for high resolution version. Please credit “NOAA.”)

Snow was tapering off Sunday in the Washington-Baltimore corridor but continued to fall from Philadelphia to New York and Boston and into Maine. Accompanying some of the heavy snow was lightning and thunder, known as "thundersnow" with snowfall accumulations of two to four inches per hour along the I-95 corridor.

Preliminary Snow Measurements taken on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2006
Columbia, Md., 21.3 inches
Silver Spring, Md., 11.0 inches
Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., 8.1 inches
Arlington, Va., 8.0 inches
Baltimore-Washington International Airport, 11.2 inches
Wilmington, Del., 9.0 inches
Philadelphia, Penn., 11.0 inches
Middlesex, N.J., 9.0 inches
New York City’s Central Park, 11.8 inches
Bronx, N.Y., 8.0 inches
New Fairfield, Conn., 14.0 inches
Natick, Mass., 7.0 inches.

Blizzard conditions were occurring in the New York City area as high winds and heavy snow reduced visibility to less than a quarter mile. Blizzard warnings remain in effect for much of southeast New England.

The NOAA National Weather Service issued watches and warnings well in advance of the approaching storm, giving residents and road crews up and down the East Coast ample time to prepare.

Meteorologists had predicted the potential intensity of this storm for several days despite the difficulty in forecasting it due to lack of agreement between many computer models. The primary issue was determining exactly where and when the polar jet stream from the north would merge with the subtropical jet stream from the south. That would determine where this nor'easter would form, what track it would take and how strong it would be.

NOAA image of snow in Falls Church, Va., just outside Washington, D.C., which afforded children a chance to dust off their sleds for multiple trips down a snow-covered hill.Nevertheless, "The storm behaved very well, just as predicted", said Brian Korty, meteorologist with the NOAA Hydrological Prediction Center in Camp Springs, Md. "The axis of heavy snow was right on." (Click NOAA image for larger view of snow in Falls Church, Va., just outside Washington, D.C., which afforded children a chance to dust off their sleds for multiple trips down a snow-covered hill. Click here for high resolution version. Please credit “NOAA.”)

NOAA, an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and providing environmental stewardship of the nation's coastal and marine resources.

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Relevant Web Sites
NOAA National Weather Service

NOAA Hydrological Prediction Center

NOAA Storm Watch

Media Contact:
Dennis Feltgen, NOAA National Weather Service, (301) 713-0622 ext. 210