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FLAKES FLYING IN NORTHEAST? SAY IT ISN'T SNOW!

NOAA image of NOAA satellite snow cover analysis of the United States for Jan. 25, 2005.Jan 26, 2005 ó The NOAA National Weather Service is tracking snow returning to the Northeast for Wednesday and Thursday morning, only two days after an historic blizzard dumped record snowfall, and it could set records of its own. With four to eight inches of snow predicted, this likely will become the snowiest January on record in Boston, Mass., and Providence, R.I. (Click NOAA image for larger view of NOAA satellite snow cover analysis of the United States for Jan. 25, 2005. Click here for latest view. Please credit “NOAA.”)

January is typically the snowiest month for Boston and Providence, according the NOAA National Weather Service in Taunton, Mass., with an average of 10.6 inches and 9.7 inches, respectively. This month, already the second snowiest January on record, will be no exception.

NOAA satellite image of snow cover in the Northeast USA taken at 10:43 a.m. on Jan. 24, 2005, following a storm system that brought heavy snow and winds to the region.In Boston, 37.7 inches of snow fell the first 25 days of this month and is approaching the record 39.8 inches that fell during January 1966. For Providence, 34.5 inches of snow has fallen through Tuesday and is within reach of the record held by January 1996 with 37.4 inches. Records date back to 1872 in Boston and 1904 in Providence. (Click NOAA satellite image for larger view of snow cover in the Northeast USA taken at 10:43 a.m. on Jan. 24, 2005, following a storm system that brought heavy snow and winds to the region. Click here for high resolution version, which is a large file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

Cape Cod and Nantucket, which bore the brunt of last weekend's snow, could also receive the highest accumulations this time around. Between five and nine inches could pile on top of the two to three feet that fell last weekend.

Official NOAA National Weather Service forecasts, watches and warnings, and current conditions are always available online and via the continuous broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All-Hazards.

Click here for accumulations of snow and ice, details on new precipitation records and wind data. Then click on a state and then click on the “Public Information” button. Statements listing weather observations from official NOAA National Weather Service observation sites, storm spotters and cooperative observers will appear.

Blowing and drifting snow could again lower visibilities and cover cleared pavement as winds increase to between 15 mph and 30 mph inland and 30-40 mph along the coast. Gusts up to 55 mph are possible.

Temperatures in New England are forecast to stay below freezing into the weekend.

NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and providing environmental stewardship of the nationís coastal and marine resources. NOAA is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Relevant Web Sites
Today's National Weather

NOAA National Winter Weather Forecasts

NOAA Weather Service

NOAA Operational Daily Snow Cover Analysis (Satellite Imagery)

NOAA Snow Water Equivalent

NOAA U.S. Snow Monitoring

NOAA National Climatic Data Center (Archived Weather Data)

NOAA Weather Service Suite of Official Weather Products

NOAA Winter Weather Safety/Wind Chill

NOAA Storm Watch

Media Contacts:
Chris Vaccaro, NOAA National Weather Service, (301) 713-0622 ext. 134
National Media: Carmeyia Gillis, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, (301) 763-8000 ext. 7163
NOAA Weather Service Eastern Region: Greg Romano, (301) 713-0622 ext. 169
NOAA Weather Service Southern Region: Ron Trumbla, (817) 978-1111 ext. 140
NOAA Weather Service Central Region: Pat Slattery, (816) 891-7734 ext. 621
NOAA Weather Service Western Region: Greg Romano, (301) 713-0622 ext. 169