NOAA Magazine || NOAA Home Page || Previous Story

NOAA TAKES AERIAL IMAGES OF FLORIDA REGIONS AFFECTED BY HURRICANE JEANNE

NOAA aerial image of the damage left behind by Hurricane Jeanne in Ft. Pierce, Fla., where homes were damaged or destroyed and trees uprooted.Oct. 1, 2004 ó NOAA posted online more than 1,200 high-resolution digital aerial images of the Florida coastline affected by Hurricane Jeanne, which made landfall on Sept. 26, 2004. During five flights, the NOAA Remote Sensing Division collected imagery of the 100-mile stretch from Melbourne to Palm Beach, Fla., hours after Hurricane Jeanne slammed the east coast of the state with maximum sustained winds near 120 mph. (Click NOAA aerial image for larger view of the damage left behind by Hurricane Jeanne in Ft. Pierce, Fla., where homes were damaged or destroyed and trees uprooted. Click here for high resolution version, which is a larger file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

NOAA aerial image of the destruction left behind by Hurricane Jeanne in Ft. Pierce, Fla.The NOAA imagery was acquired to support the agency’s national security and emergency response requirements. In addition, the imagery will be used for ongoing research efforts for testing and developing standards for airborne digital imagery. The flights to collect the Florida detailed imagery were conducted between September 26 and October 1. (Click NOAA aerial image for larger view of the destruction left behind by Hurricane Jeanne in Ft. Pierce, Fla. Click here for high resolution version, which is a larger file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

NOAA used an Emerge/Applanix Digital Sensor System, or DSS, to acquire the images from an altitude of 7,000 feet. The equipment was NOAA aerial image of the path of destruction that Hurricane Jeanne cut across the Florida east coast.mounted on NOAA’s Gulfstream Turbo Commander aircraft, which is a stable high-winged twin turboprop aircraft. It is used for a variety of missions, including snow surveys. (Click NOAA aerial image for larger view of the path of destruction that Hurricane Jeanne cut across the Florida east coast. This image is from Ft. Pierce. Click here for high resolution version, which is a large file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and providing environmental stewardship of the nationís coastal and marine resources. NOAA is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Relevant Web Sites
NOAA Aerial Images of Florida Coastline Affected by Hurricane Jeanne

NOAA Remote Sensing Division

NOAA Posts Aerial Images of Hurricane Ivan’s Destruction

Media Contact:
Greg Hernandez, NOAA, (202) 482-3091