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ALEX A CATEGORY TWO HURRICANE AS IT PARALLELS THE OUTER BANKS

(See the NOAA National Hurricane Center for the latest information on this storm. Complete advisories are posted at 11 a.m., 5 p.m., 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. All times are Eastern. Advisories are posted more frequently as the storm nears the USA mainland.)

NOAA satellite image of Hurricane Alex taken at 9:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 3, 2004.Aug. 3, 2004 — At 11 a.m. EDT, the center of Hurricane Alex was located near latitude 34.7 north, longitude 75.8 west or about 40 miles south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, N.C. Alex is moving toward the northeast near 15 mph. A northeastward motion with a small increase in forward speed is expected during the next 24 hours. On the forecast track, the center of Alex is expected to remain just offshore of the North Carolina Outer Banks. However, any motion to the left of the expected track could bring the center of the hurricane over the Outer Banks, according to the NOAA National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. (Click NOAA satellite image for larger view of Hurricane Alex taken at 9:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 3, 2004. Click here for high resolution version, which is a large file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

NOAA satellite image of Hurricane Alex taken at 7:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 3, 2004.Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 24 hours. Alex is the first hurricane of the 2004 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. The storm spun into a hurricane shortly after midnight Tuesday. (Click NOAA satellite image for larger view of Hurricane Alex taken at 7:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 3, 2004. Click here for high resolution version, which is a large file. Please credit “NOAA.”)

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 25 miles, mainly to the east of the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 972 mb, 28.70 inches.

Additional rainfall accumulations of 3 to 6 inches can be expected in association with Alex.

NOAA tracking map of Hurricane Alex.Coastal storm surge flooding of 2 to 4 feet above normal tide levels can be expected on Atlantic shorelines. Storm surge flooding of 3 to 5 feet above normal tide levels can be expected inside Pamlico Sound. High surf and rip currents will affect much of the southeastern and mid-Atlantic U.S. coastal areas for the next couple of days. (Click NOAA image for larger view of Hurricane Alex tracking map.)

Isolated tornadoes are possible over the Outer Banks Tuesday afternoon.

At 11 a.m. EDT, the tropical storm warning is discontinued south of Surf City, N.C. A tropical storm warning remains in effect from Surf City to Cape Lookout.

A hurricane warning remains in effect from Cape Lookout to Oregon Inlet, N.C., including the Pamlico Sound. This means that hurricane conditions are expected within the warning area during the next 24 hours. Preparations to protect life and property should have been completed.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect from north of Oregon Inlet to the North Carolina/Virginia border, including the Albemarle Sound.

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Relevant Web Sites
NOAA National Hurricane Center — Get the latest advisories here

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NOAA Atlantic Hurricanes Database — 150 Years of Atlantic Hurricanes

Above-normal 2004 Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

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Media Contact:
Frank Lepore, NOAA Hurricane Center, (305) 229-4404